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Archive for February, 2013

From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

 

Frontispiece from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer...

Frontispiece from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain (1st ed., 1876): Sawyer fishing (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Area-Sneak: a boy thief who commits depredations upon kitchens and cellars. See Crow.

Crow: one who watches whilst another commits a theft, a confederate in a robbery. The Crow looks to see that the way is clear, whilst the Sneak, his partner, commits the depredation.

(For some reason Tom Sawyer and his “depredation” on window sills comes to mind.)

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thankyouI just wanted to give a heartfelt thank you to all my readers out there.

Last night we reached well past 1000 all-time views for this blog, I’ve done 238 posts, and my short story Francesca and the Baron’s Son reached over 130 downloads in one day.

Some people might say that’s small potatoes, but to someone like me, a writer who’s been trying to break into the business for nearly a decade, this is huge and I’m overwhelmed. I know there is a lot of noise out there these days, so thank you for listening to my small voice.

Catherine

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

 

English: Painting of American author Washingto...

English: Painting of American author Washington Irving (1783-1859) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Almighty Dollar: an American expression for the “power of money,” first introduced by Washington Irving in 1837.

 

(Well, this one hits close to home. I had no idea the saying went back so far or who started it.
Apparently greed is nothing new.)

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

 

Location of the ceremonial county of Somerset ...

Location of the ceremonial county of Somerset within England. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

All To Smash or Gone To Pieces: bankrupt, or smashed to pieces. Somersetshire.
(I like All To Smash. Very descriptive. Though I would not have guessed bankrupt. Tom and I went through Somerset a few years ago. Pretty country and, being from Wisconsin and a devoted Cheddar Head I was thrilled to hike through the Cheddar Gorge where the yummy orange stuff was invented.)

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Hi Friends,

FrancescaBaronsSonGood News! My short story, Francesca and the Baron’s Son is now available in digital format for the Kindle. For the next five days it will be FREE to download.

Francesca and the Baron’s Son

In Tuscany during the 1700’s a girl had to know her place or there were consequences.

Try telling that to Francesca DiCesare, the eleven-year-old daughter of Maestro DiCesare, Europe’s most renowned fencing master. Francesca has more courage than common sense, and learns her lesson – just not the one they were trying to teach her.

Set amid the blushing poppies in the Tuscan countryside, this is the first in a series of coming of age stories.

This story introduces Francesca, the title heroine of my novel, LADY BLADE. The novel takes place when Francesca is eighteen, so this is a precursor. Personally, I’d like to keep the story for free, but Amazon frowns on that apparently, so after this promotion it will be for sale for 99 cents a pop. I’ll do more free promotions as often as Amazon will let me, which I believe is every 90 days. So feel free to download and share with friends. And if you like it, I would love a review or  “like.”

Thanks to everyone who gave me feedback on the cover picture! I think it turned out well!

I hope to have more stories soon!

Catherine Thrush

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.


All To Pieces
: utterly, excessively; “he beat him All To Pieces,” i.e., excelled or surpassed him exceedingly.

 

(I think people would probably catch your drift if you used that one today. Maybe I should try it and see.)

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

 

Spruce, showily dressed females.

Spruce, showily dressed females.

All-There: in strict fashion, first-rate, “up to the mark;” a vulgar person would speak of a spruce, showily-dressed female as being All-There. An artisan would use the same phrase to express the capabilities of a skillful fellow workman.

(I imagine our definition of a spruce, showily-dressed female has changed dramatically, but the phrase still works. )

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Gin Barrels

Gin Barrels


Alls
: tap-droppings, refuse spirits sold at a cheap rate in gin places. See Lovage.

Lovage: tap-droppings, a mixture of spirits, sweetened and sold to habitual dram-drinkers, principally females. Called also Alls.
(Sounds disgusting, but what do I know. Or was that perhaps the original cocktail?)

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

 

 

A serene landscape photography

A serene landscape photography (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

All-Serene: an ejaculation of acquiescence.

 

 

 

(That definition is a mouthful. But all-serene is a very descriptive saying. Gives rise to thoughts of smooth waters.)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Portrait de Chateaubriand méditant sur les ruines de Rome

Portrait de Chateaubriand méditant sur les ruines de Rome

All-Rounders: the fashionable shirt collars of the present time worn meeting in front.

(I love it when the present time is a few hundred years ago.

I tried to find a picture, but I’m not sure I succeeded. I can’t seem to find any mention of All-Rounders. Anyone know for sure?)

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