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Archive for March, 2013

From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tonguesv first published in 1859.

Norwich

Norwich (Photo credit: m thierry)

Canary: a sovereign. This is stated by a correspondent to be a Norwich term, that city being famous for its breed of those birds.

(Hmmm, do they mean sovereign as in a ruler or as in the coin? I suppose the fact that sovereign isn’t capitalized may mean that they are referring to the coin.)

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

English: "Jonathan Edwards," lithogr...

English: “Jonathan Edwards,” lithograph of the clergyman, author and theologian. Image courtesy of the Yale University Manuscripts & Archives Digital Images Database, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Camister: a preacher, clergyman, or master.

(I wish they’d give us a bit more. I couldn’t find any additional information online. I like the sound of Camister, but I wonder how it relates and what the connotations were.)

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Gypsy

Gypsy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Camesa: shirt or chemise. Span. Ancient cant, Commission.

(Hmmm, Camesa is very similar also to camisole, so it makes sense. But what does Commission have to do with anything? Is he saying that a shirt was originally called a Commission? Your guess is as good as mine.)

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Hi Guys!
You’ve all been great! I’ve got 26 stellar reviews on my entry into the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Contest. Thank you so much! If even a quarter of what you’ve all said it true I did my job well.

Currently there are 5 people with more reviews than me (one person has over 70! Can you believe it!) Since the next cutoff for the contest is the top 25 entries – and there are 5 categories – I’d love to be in the top five in the number of reviews in my category. So if anyone one out there hasn’t done a review yet and has a few minutes to read the first two chapters of my historical fiction novel, Lady Blade, and do a review, I’d be over the moon. It doesn’t need to be a long, a few words is just fine.

You can download the chapters free from Amazon for a Kindle. If you don’t have a Kindle you can also download a Kindle app for free to your computer or PDA.

So if you haven’t already, please help me win $50,000 and a book deal, and I hope you’ll enjoy the read in the meantime.

Here’s the link to LADY BLADE entry

What’s it about you ask? Well, here is the pitch that got me this far in the contest.

Francesca DiCesare is the daughter of Italy’s most illustrious fencing maestro – and his most gifted pupil. From the speed of a parry, to the power and grace of a perfect lunge, she sees the art of the sword as an elegant and electrifying dance. Francesca never thought of her sword as a weapon; not until the morning of Papa’s duel – not until Papa lay dying and his opponent lay dead by her hand.

Forced to flee Italy or face the gallows, Francesca takes ship for England vowing to uphold Papa’s uncompromising code of honor.

Francesca enjoys the sea’s ever-changing moods and thrills at the bucking deck and the snap and hum of the crisp white sails – until pirates attack from the starboard bow. She fights with all the skill Papa has given her, and eight pirates die by her sword before she’s taken captive by pirate captain Will Massey.

Forced to join Will’s crew as they raid the Spanish Main, Francesca is drawn into the pirates’ nefarious world, and to the bold and vital captain. As she makes friends with Carter, an orphaned ship’s boy, and Miller, a grizzled old pirate, she learns that life is seldom as black and white as Papa led her to believe, and that Papa was not the paragon of honor she thought him to be.

Francesca’s swordsmanship earns her respect among the pirates and wins her the captain’s heart. To her horror, she discovers she adores being a pirate – not the killing, which flays her conscience day and night, but the freedom, and the thrill of adventure. Can she give up the man she loves and the life that she seems destined to live to keep her vow?

You guys are the best!

Catherine Thrush

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Old boots of seal fur-skin

Old boots of seal fur-skin (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bats: a pair of bad boots.

(Gee, I wonder what makes them bad? Fit? Workmanship? Overuse? We may never know.)

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Hudibras Sallying Forth, one of 12 illustratio...

Hudibras Sallying Forth, one of 12 illustrations for the 1726 edition. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bat: “on his own Bat,” on his own account. See Hook.

Hook: to steal or rob. See the following.

Hook or by Crook; by fair means or foul in allusion to the hook which footpads used to carry to steal from open windows, &c., and from which Hook, to take or steal, has been derived. Mentioned in Hudibras as a cant term.

(Hmm, still not seeing exactly how Bat relates to Hook. Hudibras is an English mock heroic narrative poem from the 17th century written by Samuel Butler. )

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Walnut trees

Walnut trees (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bash: to beat, thrash; “Bashing a donna,” beating a woman; originally a provincial word, and chiefly applied to the practice of beating walnut trees, when in bud, with long poles, to increase their productiveness. Hence the West country proverb

A woman, a whelp, and a walnut tree,
The more you Bash’em, the better they be.

(Wow, that’s not offensive at all! As I’ve said so many times – I’m glad times have changed.)

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859

The UK Utterly Butterly display team flying Bo...

The UK Utterly Butterly display team flying Boeing Stearman PT-17 biplanes at an English air show (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Barn-Stormers: theatrical performers who travel the country and act in barns, selecting short and frantic pieces to suit the rustic taste. Theatrical.

(Well what do you know. I’ve heard of biplane pilots who traveled around the country to give airshows and take people flying for a price. I knew they were referred to as Barn-Stormers, I just didn’t know why. It’s all coming together.)

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Barrikin: jargon, speech, or discourse; “we can’t tumble to that Barrikin,” i.e., we don’t understand what he says. Miege calls it “a sort of stuff.”

(“A sort of stuff?” Yeah, that narrows it down.)

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

 

English: Line art drawing of spectacles. Suomi...

English: Line art drawing of spectacles. Suomi: Piirustus, joka esittää silmälaseja. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Barnacles: a pair of spectacles; corruption of Binoculi?

 

(I’ve always liked that one. In my book the orphaned ship’s boy, Carter, refers to the Scottish doctor as Barnacles because of his glasses.)

 

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