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Archive for March, 2013

From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Barker at the grounds at the Vermont state fai...

Barker at the grounds at the Vermont state fair, Rutland (LOC) (Photo credit: The Library of Congress)

Barker: a man employed to cry at the doors of “gaffs,” shows, and puffing shops, to entice people inside.

(I’m not surprised this one goes back so far. I wonder what a puffing shop is. A smokehouse perhaps? I also wonder what they were puffing. And for that matter, what’s a “gaff?” Alas, I may never know.)

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I found a great page of historic Women Warriors of Francesca’s era. She was by no means alone in her love of the sword. Check it out! (They have other time periods as well.)

Women Warriors

Here is just a small taste.

Mademoiselle La Maupin, an actress who died in 1707, was trained in swordfighting by her father. She issued more than one challenge to duel, and was pardonned by King Louis XIV after killing several men in one evening at a ball.
(source: “The Duel” – Robert Baldick – Spring Books – 0 600 32837 6)

A woman soldier Christian Davies (or Mother Ross) was reported to have received a pension from the Royal Chelsea Hospital at the beginning of the 18th Century.
(source “Hannah Snell, The Secret Life of a Female Marine” – Matthew Stephens – Ship Street Press – 0-9530565-0-3)

Comptesse de Polignac and Marquise de Nesle fought a duel over their lover the Duc de Richelieu
(source: “The Duel” – Robert Baldick – Spring Books – 0 600 32837 6)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

French flintlock pistol circa 1790-1795

French flintlock pistol circa 1790-1795

Barking Irons: pistols.

(I loved those guys sense of description!  They were iron and they did bark pretty loudly when you pulled the trigger.)

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

English: "An Hindoo Temple, at Madura,&qu...

English: “An Hindoo Temple, at Madura,” an aquatint by Thomas and William Daniell, 1798 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Banyan-Day: a day on which no meat is served out for rations; probably derived from the Banians, a Hindoo caste, who abstain from animal food. Sea.

(What do you know, every day is Banyan-Day at our house, since we’re vegivores. I like the way they spelled Hindoo. I wonder when it changed to Hindu.)

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

 

 

Bantling: a child; stated in Bacchus and Venus, 1737, and by Grose, to be a cant term.

 

 

(After a little research I’ve found that Bantling was generally considered a derogatory term, rather like brat, and most likely came from the German Bänkling: illegitimate child. )

 

 

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

 

 

 

Barney'sTail

Barney’sTail (Photo credit: ranesbluesky)

 

Barney: a Lark, Spree, rough enjoyment; “get up a Barney,” to have a “lark.”

 

 

 

Barney: a mob, a crowd.

 

 

 

(And you thought it was going to be a purple dinosaur.)

 

 

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

 

 

 

Español: Bang

Español: Bang (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Bang: to excel or surpass; Banging, great or thumping.

 

 

 

Bang-Up: first rate.

 

 

 

(Don’t think I’ve heard the first two but I have heard Bang-up and used it myself from time to time – usually in relation to how well someone did something. “Bang-up job, Fred.”)

 

 

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

English: George III sixpence coins, 1787 and 1818

English: George III sixpence coins, 1787 and 1818 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bandy or Cripple: a sixpence, so called from this coin being generally bent or crooked; old term for flimsy or bad cloth, temp. Q. Elizabeth.

(Okay, I have no idea what “, temp. Q. Elizabeth” means. Do they mean that Queen Elizabeth employed the term or that is was used during her reign? And if that is what they mean do they mean the old usage – flimsy or bad cloth, or do they mean the new usage – a sixpence. Alas, so many questions, so few answers.)

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Banded: hungry.

(I like it. It does feel  like you’ve got a band around your stomach when you’re really hungry. Not pleasant at all.)

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Hi Everyone,

Now that I’ve made it into the quarterfinal round of the Amazon Contest, the first two chapters of LADY BLADE are posted on Amazon for customer reviews. That means anyone can put in their two cents worth and the results go toward deciding who wins!

Sooo, if you have a few moments, I would be eternally grateful for some reviews – if you like it. It’s free to download the chapters to your kindle app.

Here is the link:

LADY BLADE Excerpt

Thank you for your support!

 

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