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Archive for May, 2014

Hi Folks,

Our new Kickstarter!

Our new Kickstarter!

That’s right! My Kickstarter funded with 12 days left to go! I wish you could see my happy dance!

I’m offering some of my artwork as well as three journals. Two of them are for long RPG campaigns and the other one is for recording your RPGs and boardgames at conventions.

If you’re into gaming, check it out, and tell your friends!

 

Cathy

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

among the gods.

among the gods.

Gods: the people in the upper gallery of a theatre; “up amongst the Gods,” a seat amongst the low persons in the gallery so named from the high position of the gallery, and the blue sky generally painted on the ceiling of the theatre; termed by the French, Parade.

(When is a “low person” a god? At the theater of course!)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Virgil

Virgil

Go It: a term of encouragement, implying “keep it up!” Sometimes amplified to Go it, Ye Cripples; said to have been a facetious rendering of the last line of Virgil’s Eclogues “Ite domum Saturae, Venit Hesperus, ite capillae;” or, “Go it, ye cripples, crotches are cheap.”

(I’m sure they meant crutches. Right? I sure hope so!

The “low crowd” did seem quite familiar with classic literature. Who here knows the last line of Virgil’s anything?)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

sulkyGlumpish: of a stubborn, sulky temper.

(I thank my lucky stars that I’m only occasionally Glumpish.)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Mouth_Shout_by_Helewidis_stocksGob: the mouth; mucus, or saliva. North. Sometimes used for Gab, talk.

There was a man called Job,
Dwelt in the land of Uz;
He had a good gift of the Gob;
The same case happen us.
Zach. Boyd.

Gob: a portion.

(I did get to use this one a few times in Lady Blade. “Watch yer gob” or “stop yer gob” were great ways to say “shut up.”)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

images20Go: a Go of gin, a quartern of that liquor.

Go: is also synonymous with circumstance or occurrence; “a rummy Go,” and “a great Go,” signify curious and remarkable occurrences; “no Go,” no good; “here’s a pretty Go!” here’s trouble! “to Go the jump,” to enter a house by the window; “all the Go,” in fashion.

“Gemmen (says he), you all well know
The joy there is whene’er we meet;
It’s what I call the privest Go,
And rightly named, ’tis ‘quite a treat,”
Jack Randalls Diary, 1820

(“That’s a Go Houston.” “Give it a Go.” “Go for it.”  Guess things haven’t changed much. Still a darn useful little word!)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Gnostics

Gnostics

Gnostics: knowing ones, or sharpers. Nearly obsolete in it’s vulgar sense.

(By “knowing ones” I’m pretty sure they mean sly or crafty people, and sharpers were con men.  Not really the spiritual types. )

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

In a glump.

In a glump.

Glump: to sulk.

(So Snow White’s dwarf could have been Glumpy instead of Grumpy.  I like that better. 🙂

I’ve certainly has some glumpy days here and there.)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

scotland-manGloak: a man. Scotch.

(Like a bloke, only more Scottish. :-))

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

He has his begging papers, but are they legit?

He has his begging papers, but are they legit?

Glim Lurk: a begging paper, giving a certified account of a dreadful fire which never happened.

(Hmm, raises all sorts of questions. Did people who actually lost everything in a fire get some sort of certified paper allowing them to beg? Who certified these things? How long were they certified to beg for? Was there such a thing as insurance back then? What happened if you were begging without papers? Curiouser and curiouser.)

 

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