Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for July, 2014

From the  Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Looks like that Kiss-me-quick bonnet did the job.

Looks like that Kiss-me-quick bonnet did the job.

Kiss-Me-Quick: the name given to the very small bonnets worn by females since 1850.

(Really, why would you buy any other kind?)

 

Read Full Post »

From the  Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Here's a few kiss-curls.

Here’s a few kiss-curls.

Kisscurl: a small curl twisted on the temple. See Bowcatcher.

Bow-catcher: small curls twisted on the cheeks or temples of young and often old girls, adhering to the face as if gummed or pasted. Evidently a corruption of Beau-catchers. In old times these were called lovelocks, when they were the marks at which all the puritan and ranting preachers leveled their pulpit pop-guns, loaded with sharp and virulent abuse. Hall and Pryune looked upon all woman as strumpets who dared to let the hair depart from a straight line upon their cheeks. The French prettily term them accroche-coeurs, whilst in the United States they are plainly and unpleasantly called Spit-curls. Bartlett says: “Spit Curl, a detached lock of hair curled upon the temple; probably from having been at first plastered into shape by the saliva. it is now understood that the mucilage of quince seed it used by the ladies for this purpose.”

You may prate of your lips, and your teeth of pearl,
And your eyes so brightly flashing;
My song shall be of the Saliva Curl
Which threatens my heart to smash in.
Boston Transcript, October 30, 1858

When men twist the hair on each side of the faces into ropes they are sometimes called Bell-Ropes, as being wherewith to draw the belles. Whether Bell-ropes or Bow-catchers, it is singular they should form part of the prisoner’s paraphernalia, and that a jaunty little kiss-me quick curl should, of all things in the world, ornament a goal dock; yet such was formerly the case. Hunt the murderer of Weare, on his trial, we are informed by the Athenaeum, appeared at the bar with a highly pomatumed love-lock sticking tight to his forehead. Young ladies think of this!

(Getting all bent out of shape about a curl? I wonder what they’d think of some of today’s hairstyles!)

 

Read Full Post »

Class-y shirts for the well-dressed gamer.

Class-y shirts for the well-dressed gamer.

What can I say? I love doing Kickstarters.

It’s wonderful to see people get enthused about your projects. So here it is, Kickstarter number three, T-shirts for RPG gamers – one for each class.

RPG Tees

Check it out, and tell your gaming friends!

Cathy Thrush

Read Full Post »

From the  Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

That looks like one fuddled dog!

That looks like one fuddled dog!

Kisky: drunk, fuddled.

(Another one I think we should bring back.  And I like “fuddled.” Never heard that one before. I wonder how it changed to befuddled.)

 

Read Full Post »

From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Picture of Queen Elizabeth I.

Picture of Queen Elizabeth I.

King’s Pictures (now, of course, Queen’s Pictures): money.

(Make perfect sense. It’s good to have lots of King’s pictures in your pocket.)

 

Read Full Post »

From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Costermonger sporting a scarlet Kingsman.

Costermonger sporting a scarlet Kingsman.

Kingsman: the favorite coloured neckerchief of the costermongers. The women wear them thrown over their shoulders. With both sexes they are more valued than any other article of clothing. A coster’s caste, or position, is at stake, he imagines, if his Kingsman is not of the most approved pattern. When he fights, his Kingsman is tied either around his waist as a belt, or as a garter around his leg. This very singular partiality for a peculiar colored neckcloth was doubtless derived from the Gipsys, and probably refers to an Oriental taste or custom long forgotten by theses vagabonds. A singular similarity of taste for certain colours exists amongst the Hindoos, Gipsys, and London costermongers. Red and yellow (or orange) are the great favorites, and in these hues the Hindoo selects his turban and his robe; the Gipsy his breeches and his wife her shawl or gown; and the costermonger his plush waistcoat and favorite Kingsman. Amongst either class, when a fight takes place, the greatest regard is paid to the favorite coloured article of dress. The Hindoo lays aside his turban, the Gipsy folds up his scarlet breeches or coat, whilst the pugilistic costermonger of Covent Garden or Billingsgate, as we have just seen, removes his favorite neckerchief to a part of his body, by the rules of the “ring” comparatively out of danger.  Amongst the various pattern of kerchief worn by the wandering tribes of London, red and yellow are the oldest and most in fashion. Blue, intermixed with spots, is a late importation, probably from the Navy, through sporting characters.

(Costermongers were the street vendors who hawked their wares throughout London. The streets must have been colorful places if all the costermongers were dressed up in their bright-colored clothing. Wish I could take a glimpse back through time to see it. I really gotta finish building that time machine. 🙂

I suppose all those bright colors were good for business. It pays to be seen when you’re selling your wares.)

 

Read Full Post »

From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

A kinchin cove?

A kinchin cove?

Kinchin Cove: a man who robs children; a little man. Ancient cant.

(Now that’s an insult! Them’s fighting words. You don’t get much lower than that.)

 

Read Full Post »

From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Some kinchin kickin' it.

Some kinchin kickin’ it.

Kinchin: a child. Old cant. From the German diminutive Kindchen, a baby.

(Awww. Kinchin is really quite sweet. Definitely have to remember that one.)

 

Read Full Post »

From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

220px-Akimbo-photo_(PSF)Kimbo or A Kimbo: holding the arms in a bent position from the body, and resting the hands upon the hips, in a bullying attitude. Said to be from A Schembo, Italian; but more probably from Kisebaw, the old cant for beating, or bullying. See Grose.

(Another word that’s made the transition from slang to proper English.

It’s definitely a power position. I don’t tend to think of it so much as bullying. I tend to stand A Kimbo when I’ve got a big project to tackle and I’m psyching myself up for it – giving myself power. Then again, if someone was standing over me A Kimbo I’d likely feel threatened – depending on who it was.)

 

Read Full Post »

From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Cuz every girl's crazy 'bout a sharp-dressed man.

Cuz every girl’s crazy ’bout a sharp-dressed man.

Killing: bewitching, fascinating. The term is akin to the phrase “dressing to DEATH.”

(Wow! So that’s where “dressed to kill” comes from. Not a new concept apparently.)

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: