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Archive for February, 2015

From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

above_my_payBend: “that’s above my Bend,” i.e., beyond my power, to expensive, or too difficult for me to perform.

(I suppose we might say “that’s above my pay grade” in much the same manner.)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Could he be drinking Belly-vengence?

Could he be drinking Belly-vengeance?

Belly-vengeance: small sour beer, apt to cause gastralgia.

(Thanks, I think I’ll pass on that one. Who would order that? Unless its reeeeeally cheap.)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

They do look a little bit like logs...

They do look a little bit like logs…

Belly-timber: food, or “grub.”

(That is what you stoke your own fires with.)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Simple, effective.

Simple, effective.

Bellows: the lungs.

(Of course.)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Singing a bell together...

Singing a bell together…

Bell: a song.

(I suppose a bell rings in the air, as a song might. Also, “bella” means “beautiful” in Italian. Works for me.)

 

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Hi Folks,

Columbus, Ohio as a land of myth and magic.

Columbus, Ohio as a land of myth and magic.

Yup, this post has very few pirates in it. But it does have Buckeyes.

Besides being a writer and a pirate aficionado, I’m also an artist. A year or so ago, I drew a map of Silicon Valley in LotR style – Silidor Valley as I like to call it. My husband and I did a successful Kickstarter for the map, doubling what we were asking for!

During that campaign, one of the backers  commissioned me to do map of his home town, Columbus, Ohio. We spoke at length about his memories of Columbus and he was thrilled with the original art work I did for him.  Now we’re looking for backing to get prints made of my fantasy map of Columbourne, Ohigh-Oh.

So check it out

Columbourne, Ohigh-Oh a map of the magical realm we live in.

and please pass it on to your favorite Buckeyes. After all, are you really going to let Silicon Valley beat Columbus? We want to see this map get made!

And visit us at our website: http://www.urbanrealms.com/

Thanks!

Cathy Thrush

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

A pair of squashers.

A pair of squashers.

Beetle-crushers or Squashers: large flat feet.

(Yes, I imagine they’d be very effective for that sort of thing.)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Beeswax does look a lot like cheese, doesn't it?

Beeswax does look a lot like cheese, doesn’t it?

Beeswax: poor soft cheese.

(So what’s wrong with soft cheese? I’m a fan of a nice brie. Perhaps back in the day it meant that the cheese hadn’t been aged properly.

Can’t say I’ve ever bitten into beeswax, but I suppose the consistency might be quite similar.)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Very, very beery.

A very beery photo.

Beery: intoxicated, or fuddled with beer.

(Simple, straight to the point. It just might be time for this one to make a comeback.)

 

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From the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

James Belcher wearing one.

Pugilist, James Belcher

Belcher: a kind of handkerchief. See Billy.

Billy: a silk pocket handkerchief. See Wipe.

Wipe: a pocket handkerchief. Old cant.

(It could have been called a Belcher because you covered your mouth with it when you belched. That would at least make sense. And a Wipe is pretty self-evident. But why was it called a Billy?

Perhaps Billy was a specific person. I did find these specifics of a Belcher – close striped pattern, yellow silk, and intermixed with white and a little black; named from the pugilist, Jim Belcher. How perfect is that!)

 

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