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Posts Tagged ‘pundefinediundefinedrundefinedaundefinedtundefinedeundefinedsundefinednundefinedaundefineduundefinedtundefinediundefinedcundefinedaundefinedlundefinedwundefinedrundefinediundefinedtundefinediundefined’

From A New Look at Old Words originally found in the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

That's one peery little dog.

That’s one peery little dog.

Peery: suspicious, or inquisitive.

(I suppose because you peer at or into things.)

 

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From A New Look at Old Words originally found in the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Yup, those are my peepers.

Yup, those are my peepers.

Peepers: eyes; “painted Peepers,” eyes bruised or blackened from a blow

(I remember a very old jingle, “jeepers, creepers, where’d you get those peepers.” Can’t however remember what it was for.

I do enjoy “painted peeper” and used it in my novel.)

 

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From A New Look at Old Words originally found in the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

british_bobby-111x300

A Bobby, not a Peeler I believe.

Peeler: a policeman; so called from Sir Robert Peel (see Bobby); properly applied to the Irish constabulary rather than the City police, the former force having been established by Sir Robert Peel.

Bobby: a policeman. Both Bobby and Peeler were nicknames given to the new police, in allusion to the christian and surnames of the late Sir Robert Peel, who was the prime mover in effecting their introduction and improvement. The term Bobby is, however, older than the Saturday Reviewer, in his childish and petulant remarks, imagines. The official square-keeper, who is always armed with a cane to drive away idle and disorderly urchins, has, time out of mind, been called by the said urchins, Bobby the Beadle. Bobby is also, I may remark, an old English word for striking or hitting, a quality not unknown to policemen. —See Halliwell’s Dictionary.

(Well there you have it. Policemen have been Bobbys for “time out of mind.” And Peelers for not quite so long.)

 

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From A New Look at Old Words originally found in the Dictionary of Nautical, University, Gypsy and Other Vulgar Tongues first published in 1859.

Looking a bit peckish.

Looking a bit peckish.

Peck: food; “Peck and booze,” meat and drink. —Lincolnshire. Ancient cant, Pek, meat.

Pecker: “keep your Pecker up,” i.e., don’t get down-hearted, —literally, keep your beak or head well up, “never say die!”

Peckish: hungry. Old cant, Peckidge, meat.

(Hmm, should be a Thursday threefer, but I guess I’m a day late. I say “I’m feeling a bit peckish” all the time. I always assumed it came from birds pecking at their food. Great to know where it really comes from.)

 

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